caladiums

Caladiums are tropical colorful plants with white, green, red, or pink variegated leaves.

They are very attractive tropical perennial plants and are widely grown as a houseplant. You can find thousands of Caladiums cultivars to choose from.

Although Caladiums are stunning when planted en masse in garden beds and add to your home’s curb appeal when grown outdoors, you can grow Caladiums indoors year-round as houseplants.

All you need is small pots to grow Caladium indoors. So, what is the best pot size for Caladiums?

Grow Caladiums in well-drained pots of about 200mm – 300mm (7.8 inches) deep and 70-100 diameter wide. Caladiums grow well in spacious environment, whether outdoors or indoors. It’s best to place the potted caladium in a spot that’s well lit, but avoid direct sunlight at all costs.

If this sounds like your next action, you may want to know the best pot size for Caladium. This quick guide directs you on how to plant Caladium in your home and on the best pot size for Caladiums.  

Where to Plant Caladiums?

Caladiums are happier when planted in warm, humid, and shady areas, where most other plants may not survive. Although Caladiums are tolerant of filtered sunlight, bright indirect sunlight, or partial shade, they prefer full shade in warmer regions.

Caladium will grow well in well-draining soil. However, if you notice water puddles about five to six hours after a hard rain, you should either amend the soil with organic material to improve the drainage or scout out another planting site.

When to Plant Caladiums?

If you’re planting your Caladium outside, plant the Caladium tubers in the spring after the risk of frost has passed and daytime temperatures are above 70°F.

Caladiums will only grow when the soil is warm.

However, if you’re planting Caladium in a colder climate, you can always start growing the Caladiums indoors for about four to six weeks before the average last frost date. Depending on the air temperature and soil quality, your Caladium tubers should sprout and develop roots a few weeks after planting.

How to Plant Caladiums?

If you’re planting your Caladiums outdoors, find a planting spot where your Caladiums will receive filtered sunlight, bright indirect, or partial shade. Dig holes of about 2in. deep and about 8in. to 12in. apart and plant the tubers. Make sure that the growing points or “eyes” are facing up.

If you’re planting your Caladiums in pots or containers, the pot or container should be deeper than 2in. Also, select a pot with adequate drainage holes and fill it with good quality, well-drained soil. Plant the Caladium tubers about 2in. deep with the growing points or “eyes” facing up.

Whether indoors or outdoors, water the Caladium tubers generously after planting to settle the soil around the tubers.

The Best Pot Size for Caladiums

Now you know that you have to plant the Caladium tubers about 2in. deep into the soil. The best pot size for Caladium largely depends on the sizes of the Caladium tubers.

We advise that you choose Jumbo size tubers to get larger, fuller Caladium plants faster, choose No.1 size tubers if you have a long growing season and your Caladium will have lots of time to mature.

Although the sizes of Caladium tubers vary naturally by variety. So, not every jumbo-sized tuber will look the same. Generally, Jumbo-sized tubers are about 2.5in. to 3.5in. in diameter, while No.1 size tubers are about 1.5in. to 2.5in.

Hence, use a pot that is about 3.5in. in diameter and 3in. in depth for Jumbo-sized tubers, and a pot that is about 2.5in. in diameter and 3in. in depth for No.1 sized tubers.

What Kind of Container Is Best for Growing Caladiums?

The kind of container used for growing Caladiums doesn’t matter so much as long as you provide the Caladiums with the proper environment, a good well-drained soil, the right amount of moisture, and good water-soluble fertilizer.

The right amount of sunlight and a good soil mix will promote quick growth, brilliant colors, and lots of leaves irrespective of the kind of container type, as long as the best pot size is used.

Clay pots are always good. However, gardeners or Caladium enthusiasts who planted lots of Caladiums of diverse shapes, sizes, colors, and styles may find the cost and acquisition of clay pots rather challenging.

People who plant Caladium in large numbers may use containers ranging from clay pots to tin cans. If you use tin cans or metal containers, we recommend that you line them with plastic bags to prevent the container from rusting and to protect the roots and tubers.

Irrespective of the kind of container you use, ensure that you put a 1in. layer of rocks, broken crockery, or some other good drainage material in the bottom of each container before adding the soil, planting mixture, and tubers. Also, ensure that the container has ample drainage holes at the bottom.

If you’re planting Caladium tubers in small pots, place them under a good light source and continue to keep the temperature between 65°F and 75°F. Spray with water frequently to prevent excessive dryness.

Caring for Your Caladiums

Caring for your Caladium plants is very easy. Water your Caladiums enough to keep the soil slightly and evenly moist but never enough for it to be too wet or water-logged. Once Caladiums begin to grow, you’ll need to increase the amount of water to supply the Caladium plants with ample hydration.

Trim off any yellow foliage from the Caladium plants after the end of the season to tidy up your garden or home.

Caladiums need warm, rich well-drained soil, proper watering, and good fertilizing. All in all, Caladiums provide a very synergistic planting experience in that what you reap is far greater than what you sow.

When your Caladiums have become well-established, caring for them becomes very easy. Just remember to always keep them well-watered and lightly apply a balanced liquid fertilizer every two or three weeks.

Before transplanting your potted Caladiums outside, harden them off a bit by setting them out in the indirect sun on pleasant days and leaving them out for a few hours at a time.

Ensure that they are protected from very strong rays of sun, wind, or chill. Increase the amount of time the Caladiums spend outside a little bit at a time every day. After about a couple of weeks, the Caladium plants should be ready for transplanting into an outdoor garden bed.

Note, unlike many bulbs and tubers of other plants, Caladiums like to be well-watered. Try as much as possible never to dry them out, but don’t make them get too soggy too – apply the right amount of water. Mulch over the soil with partially rotted compost or leaves to help preserve the moisture and prevent weed growth. Mulching will also hold in moisture and feed the soil.

Other Caladium Tips and Tricks

Whenever necessary, amend the soil with the addition of composted manure, finely ground bark, or compost to raise the level two to three in. and improve drainage.
Caladiums’ large leaves are prone to damage. Hence, plant your Caladiums in areas with some level of protection from wind.

Expect sprouts and roots to form a few weeks after planting, with mature sizes growing up to 25in. in height.
When choosing the right pot size for Caladiums, bear in mind the mature sizes of your Caladium plants.

You can grow Caladiums with other plants in the same container. Just bear in mind that all these plants must have the same water and light needs.

Conclusion

Caladiums are colorful plants that make a beautiful addition to your home interiors or exteriors. You can either plant Caladiums in your garden bed or container, especially for indoor planting.

While choosing a container to plant your Caladium, choose a container that is wide enough to contain the Caladium tubers and deep enough to allow 2in. of depth to grow the tuber.

The container must also have adequate drainage holes and fill it with good quality, well-drained soil.

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